After the Bad News… When Patients Hear Something Different than What Was Said

How many times have you begun a conversation with a patient or family, only to discover their understanding of the situation is far different from what the referring physician has shared with you? All too often, it seems, judging from the large attendance at this informative, lively session that led attendees through the labyrinth of … Read moreAfter the Bad News… When Patients Hear Something Different than What Was Said

Compassion in Canada

Sometimes when you think outside the box with the right intentions, things happen for the good. The session “Showcase Canada: Introducing Canadian Initiatives in Hospice Palliative End-of Life Care was a great overview of such a vision. The presentation was dispersed with great facts about Canadians and great pictures of many areas I want to … Read moreCompassion in Canada

NEUROTOXICANTS: Unmasking Uncommon Syndromes (333)

This lecture was very informative and was well attended. To summarize the meeting and the clinical pearls: Definition: Pharmaceutical neurotoxicant drug or drug-like entities due to its own properties or in combination with other drug or drug-like entities illicit an untoward response to its host’s nervous system Many drugs used in hospice/palliative care have potential … Read moreNEUROTOXICANTS: Unmasking Uncommon Syndromes (333)

A Whirlwind Tour of Pharmacology for Symptom Mangement in Pediatric Patients

Today at the AAHPM Assembly, I had the opportunity to attend a much-needed session on pharmacology for symptom management in pediatric patients. Sponsored by the Pediatric Special Interest Group, this “whirlwind tour” covered pharmacologic approaches to depression, anxiety, delirium and insomnia in children. The three presenters from San Diego Hospice – a palliative care physician, … Read moreA Whirlwind Tour of Pharmacology for Symptom Mangement in Pediatric Patients

Serotonin Antagonist: Should They Be Used in Palliative Medicine? (327)

Nausea and vomiting is a drag! Hope no one is feeling queasy since this talk is all about N/V. Dr. Eric Prommer is very knowledgeable about serotonin and the serotonin antagonist like ondansetron . Interestingly, serotonin, which is constantly being produced, can overcome the antagonist and this is why these medications may lose effectiveness. At … Read moreSerotonin Antagonist: Should They Be Used in Palliative Medicine? (327)

Dancing with Broken Bones: Race, Class and Spirit-Filled Dying in the Inner City (303)

David Moller has a vocation and avocation to use his training in sociology to give a voice and face to the poor, inner-city and disinfrancished living in America. There is a great divide between the large and growing underclass and the professionals that work in the medical industrial complex. David is a voice for those … Read moreDancing with Broken Bones: Race, Class and Spirit-Filled Dying in the Inner City (303)

Rage against the Dying of the Light: Geriatrics, Palliative Care, and Dementia

Case based discussion dementia is a chronic illness but not recognized as a terminal illness. There are really not any good secondary prevention measures. Most people with dementia have symptoms if we look for them. Treating depression may reverse some of the cognitive decline. Tertiary Prevention: intensive case management can make a big difference in … Read moreRage against the Dying of the Light: Geriatrics, Palliative Care, and Dementia

Concurrent Palliative Care-Peace of Mind in the Setting of an Uncertain Prognosis; Part 3

This is Part 3, the final part, of a multi-part series. My mom remained in the ICU for a total of 3 weeks, failing extubation twice due to laryngeal edema requiring emergent re-intubation and eventually requiring a tracheostomy in order to facilitate ventilator weaning. She finally was able to wean off the ventilator after 3 … Read moreConcurrent Palliative Care-Peace of Mind in the Setting of an Uncertain Prognosis; Part 3

Entrenching Hospice and Palliative Medicine in the Firmament of Organized Medicine

How AAHPM relates to other organizations such as ACP, ACS, AAFP, AAN and AAP is something our members and leadership will further address over time. AAHPM staff have created a grid for the External Awareness Task Force of the external relationships that already exist and the nature of those relationships. Again, our members and leadership will decide how these relationships should be prioritized over time and what the nature of these relationships should be. Should there be liaison representation on the boards of some of the large organizations? Is that an appropriate way for hospice and palliative medicine to become more entrenched in the firmament of organized medicine? What will be the most efficient and effective way for AHHPM to utilize its limited resources in developing these relationships? Where do we get the most bang for the buck so to speak?

Diving into the Alphabet Soup of PQRI

Four Seasons Hospice has taken the plunge and begun to participate in the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative (PQRI) of Medicare. Since fall 2010, we have successfully been submitting data on three PQRI measures: #47 (Advance Care Plan), #154 (Falls risk assessment), and #155 (Falls plan of care). Our palliative care program extends across the inpatient … Read moreDiving into the Alphabet Soup of PQRI